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to their communities, they're bussed to the trinity river, south of the dallas skyline for a final group effort, to clear brush and create an overlook along a newly opened trail. eric greitens says what we see here is an example of how military training can work in civilian life. >> there's a tremendous set of skills and abilities which they bring back from their military service that they can now use here at home. they've all learned what it takes to work with a team and accomplish a mission. they're all used to being held accountable. they know what it takes to inspire people in difficult circumstances. they know that success doesn't come easy. so they bring back those skills and also those attitudes which they can apply in a civilian context. >> you take a bunch of veterans and you put them on an objective. it's gonna get done one way or another. >> robert brown was discharged from the marines in 2004. he was suffering from a traumatic brain injury and ptsd. >> i was an rp. i was a religious programs specialist. worked with the chaplain so i worked with suicide guys. we had several attempts.
though, some will spend time with their colleagues outside of the office. workers in atlanta and dallas are most likely to spend the holiday with their colleagues. tomorrow on "n.b.r.," as we mentioned earlier, we have a thanksgiving special edition. on the fiscal cliff, those big spending cuts and tax hikes set to hit the u.s. economy on january 1, we examine whether congress and the white house can strike a deal to avoid going off the cliff. so be sure to join on us, we look at the impact of the cliff on jobs, how strategies for investors, and tom talks with mark mobius, the global investing guru. that's "nightly business report" for wednesday, november 21. happy thanksgiving everyone, and hope you have a great holiday too tom. >> tom: goodnight susie, we'll see you online at: www.nbr.com and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> join us anytime at nbr.com. there, you'll find full episodes of the program, complete show transcripts and all the market stats. also follows us on our facebook page at bizrpt. and on
correspond to cities like new york, atlanta, dallas, boston, los angeles, and they indicate how in the early 1990's, late 1980's, there was a very significant incrse inhe homicide rates. we have homicide rates all the way up to 60, 40, something like that. mexico's current homicide rate you can see on this tight. >> rose: 100,000. >> the rate is at 24 and it has raised significantly over the last few years. what we have confronted is a increase in homicide rates not only in mexico but in all the hemisphere over the last few years. in the decade between 2000 and 2010 the homicide rate, the averaghomide re in all of the americas increased by 60%. so what we're doing in mexico is a fight for security. we are improving the rule of law. we are confronting these cartels, we're trying to bring them down, bring them to justice. we are transforming institutions devoted to the rule of law. and we are also going to the most vulnerable area of society to try to reconstruct the social fabric. of course we want to have much better results. >> rose: are you succeeding. >> i think we would want to have mu
activities through a warning from assad's government. but from his comfortable life in dallas he recently engineered his younger brother's escape. en route to their meeting he spoke of his mixed feelings of having to meet them in turkey. >> very excited to see them but at the same time i cannot take the back images that we're meeting in a foreign country, not meeting at home. >> warner: where was this? this man had been serving compulsory military duty in intelligence until his assignment changed. >> we had to flee because the regime would have forced us to fight against the people. the orders we got were to crush demonstrations by any means possible even if we had to shoot them. >> warner: this man who was teaching french felt he had to flee too. >> because my brother had escaped they might arrest and torture me to get information about him. >> warner: through the help of the u.s.--and canada-based syrian support group he got his brothers out of turkey through a network of sympathizers. those the rebellion is often described as a conflict between assad ruling sect and syria's majority su
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)

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